Tag Archives: research

Cicely Saunders International BuildCARE PhD Training Fellowship (Non-clinical)

Two non-clinical PhD positions are being offered by the Cicely Saunders Institute (King’s College London). The posts are aimed at social scientists, health service/economics researchers etc and will contribute to the “International Access, Rights and Empowerment” (IARE) Study – part of the BuildCARE project.

For more information click here.

The closing date for receipt of applications is 6 April 2012.

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The 7th World Research Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care

The 7th World Research Congress of the EAPC aims to “reflect about where palliative care research stands today, and to be an arena for leading researchers within the field”.

The congress will be held in Trondheim, Norway (7-9 June 2012)

Register quickly for the Early bird registration prices (finishing March 1st)

Visit the congress webpage here

EuroImpact – Experienced Researcher (4 positions)

EuroImpact is a multi-disciplinary educational programme aimed at monitoring and improving palliative care in Europe.

EuroImpact is recruiting four experienced researchers to be based in London, Lancaster, Amsterdam and Brussels.

Description of individual research projects and institutes

Researcher 1 together with researcher 2: Developing a handbook on palliative care for older people

Researcher 1:

Work site: The Vrije Universiteit Brussel, End-of-Life Care Research Group, Brussels, Belgium for 2 years (and expected to travel to Switzerland for 3 months).

Deadline for application: March 15 2012 (provisional)

Starting date: from June 1 2012 (negotiable)

Researcher 2:

Work site: VU University Medical Center and EMGO Institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands for 1.5 years (and expected to travel to Belgium for 3 months)

Deadline for application: June 1 2012 (provisional)

Starting date: from Dec 1 2012 (negotiable)

Research project: Aim is to develop a handbook on palliative care for older people using the scientific output of the different PhD students already working in the project and working together with expert institutes conducting research in this field. An international editorial board will be set up reflecting the different important disciplines involved in palliative care for older people.

Other key activities include: to undertake research in the field of palliative and end-of-life care in a European context, to prepare reports and scientific publications, to assist in the dissemination of results, and to represent the project and department and to attend and provide research training specific to the project.

Contact persons:

Researcher 1 (Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium):

Prof dr Lieve Van den Block – Tel +32 474 78 18 72 – Email: lvdblock@vub.ac.be

Researcher 2 (VU University Medical Center and EMGO Institute, the Netherlands):

Prof dr Bregje Onwuteaka-Philipsen – Tel +31 204 44 83 85 – Email: b.philipsen@vumc.nl

Researcher 3: Developing a guideline on symptom assessment and clinical applicability of computer symptom assessment

Work site: King’s College London, London, Cicely Saunders Institute, London, UK (www.csi.kcl.ac.uk) for 1.5 years (and expected to travel to the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Pain and Palliation Research Group, Trondheim, Norway, for 3 months)

Deadline for application: March 15 2012 (provisional)

Starting date: from June 1 2012 (negotiable)

Research project: Aim is to develop an evidence based guideline on the clinical applicability of symptom assessment using the scientific output of the different PhD students already working in the project together with conducting original research, and working with experts in this field. Guideline development will follow standard methods, and involved the other organizations in EUROIMPACT.

Other key activities include: to undertake research in the field of palliative and end-of-life care in a European context, to prepare reports and scientific publications, to assist in the dissemination of results, and to represent the project and department and to attend and provide research training specific to the project.

Contact persons:

Prof dr Irene Higginson – Tel  + 44 207 848 5516 – Email irene.higginson@kcl.ac.uk / palliativecare@kcl.ac.uk

Dr Richard Harding – Tel +44 207 848 8184 – Email richard.harding@kcl.ac.uk

Mrs Lucy Bradley – Tel + 44 207 848 5518 – Email lucy.bradley@kcl.ac.uk

Researcher 4: Developing a guideline on palliative sedation

Work site: Lancaster University, International Observatory on End-of-Life Care, Lancaster, UK for 1.5 years (and expected to travel to the VU University Medical Center and EMGO Institute in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, for 3 months)

Deadline for application: January 31 2012

Starting date: from June 1 2012

Research project: Aim is to evaluate the practice of palliative sedation until death, also called terminal sedation when food and fluid are forgone, in different European countries. Recent studies have shown that the prevalence of this end-of-life decision has grown substantially in the past decades, in contrast to the empirical information about it. Research into how, why, where and by whom it is practiced is high on the agenda of palliative care research. The researcher will use several retrospective and prospective quantitative and qualitative data sets that have been or are being gathered across Europe eg. questionnaires and interviews with physicians and nurses, studies in the nursing home setting.

Other key activities include: to undertake research in the field of palliative and end-of-life care in a European context, to prepare reports and scientific publications, to assist in the dissemination of results, and to represent the project and department and to attend and provide research training specific to the project.

For more information, please visit the University’s eRecruitment site

Contact persons:

Prof dr Sheila Payne – Tel +44 1524 593701 – Email: s.a.payne@lancaster.ac.uk

Dr Sarah Brearley – Tel + 44 1524 592574 – Email: sarah.brearley@lancaster.ac.uk

For further details click here

Job Opportunity: Research Associate – Centre for Family Research

The following part-time post from the University of Cambridge may be of interest for an early stage researcher:

The research project, led by Dr Gail Ewing at the Centre for Family Research, concerns the communication of cancer diagnoses.

Candidates should ideally have a PhD in cancer or palliative care research and experience in qualitative and quantitative methods.

More information can be found on the following link.

User Consultation: Patients and Carers

The ‘Cultural Issues in End of Life Care Team’ are interested to hear patients, carers and health care professionals’ opinions and experiences of end of life care.

In order to better focus our work, we would like people to share with us their opinions and experiences, particularly the impact of culture and cultural differences in different countries and places of care.

We would also appreciate any general comments about the blog, the work and features posted to the blog, or the focus of our work.

The research carried out by our team has identified a number of important priorities in regard to culture and end of life care. We would be particularly interested to know what patients, carers and health care professionals think about the following two issues:

1. Cultural competence and care for minority ethnic groups

Evidence of low use of end of life care services by minority ethnic groups and some dissatisfaction with care has increased the popularity of ‘cultural competency’ approaches.

‘Cultural competency’ training attempts to make health care professionals sensitive to cultural differences, provide them with knowledge about different cultural traditions and includes specific skills training in areas such as communication.1-3

There have, however, been a number of criticisms raised about such training – that a focus on information about specific cultural groups can lead to stereotyping and that such training serves to routinise the encounter between healthcare professionals and service users from different cultural backgrounds.4 5

What do you think about such training?

Do you think such training can improve the quality of care?

Do you think it will lead to people from minority ethnic groups being treated differently?

Are you a healthcare professional who has undertaken such training? Do you feel that cultural competency training improved your interactions with people from different cultural backgrounds? If not, why not?

Please share your opinions and experiences by posting a comment!

2. Diversity in changing environments

Cultural differences can be as pronounced between people from different generations as people from different cultural backgrounds. In the context of changing cultural identities how should cultural preferences be taken into account in end of life care?

Do you think that cultural competency approaches are useful or even appropriate in a changing society?

Post a comment and let us know what you think!

1. Papadopoulos I, Tilki M, Taylor G. Transcultural care: a guide for health care professionals. 1998.

2. Lister P. A Taxonomy for Developing Cultural Competence. Nurse Education Today 1999;19(4):313-18.

3. Campinha-Bacote J. The process of cultural competence in the delivery of health care services: A model of care. Journal of Transcultural Nursing 2002;13(3):181-84.

4. Gunaratnam Y. Intercultural palliative care: do we need cultural competence? International Journal of Palliative Nursing 2007;13(10):470.

5. Gunaratnam Y. From competence to vulnerability: Care, ethics, and elders from racialized minorities. Mortality 2008;13(1):24-41.

World AIDS Day – 1st December

“HIV/AIDS has made medicine understand that if it is only focused on cure and ignores suffering it is not doing its job. It has made the call for what palliative care is all about imperative, and the role of palliative care in fighting HIV/AIDS inevitable. The amount of suffering is simply too great, and the promise of cure, for many, too distant. Palliative care provides an effective model for integrating many aspects of care that are essential in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Obviously the model will be quite different in Windhoek than Washington.”

J. O’Neill – Deputy Coordinator and Medical Director,

Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator, US Department of State

To mark World AIDS day we are highlighting a number of important reports which address the burden of AIDS and the availability of palliative care, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.

The first report is the 2010 edition of the ‘UNAIDS Report on the global AIDS epidemic’ which provides country by country data on AIDS prevalence and country response.

The second report, from which the above quote is taken, focuses on Sub-Saharan Africa and provides an overview of existing palliative care models from the region. The report took a broad approach, including relevant cultural, epidemiological, practice and research issues. This report, ‘Palliative Care in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Appraisal’, was produced by King’s College London and the Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Fund and published in 2004.

A further report produced by King’s College London and the Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Fund concerns paediatric palliative care in Africa. The report, ‘The Status of Paediatric Palliative Care in Sub-Saharan Africa – An Appraisal’, aims ‘to identify and appraise the evidence for paediatric palliative care in sub-Saharan Africa, in order to identify best practice and effective models of care, and to inform the development of the discipline. This report was published in 2010.

If you have any suggestions for further reading, please share them with us via the comments section.

Spiritual care recommendations for people from Black and minority ethnic (BME) groups receiving palliative care in the UK

The Cicely Saunders Institute has produced a report concerning spiritual care recommendations for people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups receiving palliative care in the UK. The holistic approach of palliative care addresses physical, psychosocial and spiritual problems.

The paucity of research and recommendations concerning spiritual care for people from BME groups has given impetus to this report, which aims to inform the provision of spiritual care for people from BME groups receiving palliative care across the UK by providing evidence-based guidance for palliative care service providers (Selman et al. 2010).

The recommendations are based on the findings of a project entitled ‘Spiritual care for patients from sub-Saharan Africa receiving palliative care in the UK’, which aimed to translate findings from a study conducted in South Africa and Uganda to the UK context (Ibid.). The recommendations also incorporate the views of over 30 experts in spiritual and cultural aspects of ‘supportive and palliative care’ (Ibid.).

Links

Full report

Executive summary

Lay summary

Reference

Selman, L., Harding, R., Speck, P., Robinson, V., Aguma, A., Rhys, A. et al. (2010). Spiritual care recommendations for people from Black and minority ethnic groups receiving palliative care in the UK Dept. Palliative Care, Policy & Rehabilitation, King’s College London.