Tag Archives: Elderly care

The University of Bath – 3 Year PhD studentship in care and cost at the end of life

The University of Bath is offering a PhD studentship as part of a project on care and costs at the end of life. The studentship will focus on inter-generational relationships between adult children and their parents in organising, and paying, for end of life care and associated expenses.

Applicants from a range of social science backgrounds (sociology, social policy, social work, gerontology, cultural studies, gender studies, anthropology, and economics), with experience in qualitative methods and an awareness of the policy implications of end of life care issues, are encouraged to apply.

Find more information here.

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What are the priorities for developing culturally appropriate palliative and end-of-life care for older people?

A research team from New Zealand has recently published an article on the priorities for developing culturally appropriate palliative and end-of-life care for older people.

Bellamy and Gott (2013) What are the priorities for developing culturally appropriate palliative and end-of-life care for older people? The views of healthcare staff working in New Zealand. Health and Social Care in the Community. 21(1), 26–34

The abstract is reproduced below and the full article can be accessed here.

Abstract

This paper explores the views of healthcare staff regarding the provision of culturally appropriate palliative care for Māori, PacificIsland and Chinese elders living in Auckland, New Zealand. The ageing population is culturally and ethnically diverse and, along with other developed countries experiencing high levels of migration, the challenge is balancing the rise in numbers of older people from different ethnic and cultural groups with end-of-life care, which reflects personal values and beliefs. Two joint interviews and ten focus groups were conducted with eighty staff across a range of primary, secondary and speciality care settings in 2010. The findings demonstrated that participants viewed the involvement of family as fundamental to the provision of palliative care for Māori, PacificIsland and Chinese elders. For Māori and Pacific Islanders, healthcare staff indicated the importance of enabling family members to provide ‘hands-on’ care. The role of family in decision-making was fundamental to the delivery of and satisfaction with care for older Chinese family members. Care staff highlighted the need to be cognisant of individual preferences both within and across cultures as a fundamental aspect of palliative care provision. The role of family in ‘hands-on’ palliative care and decision-making requires care staff to relinquish their role as ‘expert provider’. Counter to the prioritisation of autonomy in Western health-care, collective decision-making was favoured by Chinese elders. Providing families with the requisite knowledge and skills to give care to older family members was important. Whilst assumptions are sometimes made about preferences for end-of-life care based on cultural values alone, these data suggest that care preferences need to be ascertained by working with family members on an individual basis and in a manner that respects their involvement in palliative care provision.

The art and science of ageing

Population ageing is often discussed in terms societal burden and and the rising cost of health care. This negative dominant discourse is challenged by the ‘Changing Age’ campaign, which aims to ‘bring about a fundamental change in the way society views our ageing population’.

One of the campaign’s initiatives is the “The Coming of Age” exhibition. The exhibition brings together a range of work on the ‘effects, wisdom and achievements of ageing’.

The exhibition can be viewed at GV art, London, until August 18th 2012.